Calling for Net Zero Now in the Future Buildings Standard consultation

Calling for Net Zero Now in the Future Buildings Standard consultation

BLOG · BY TTF CEO, DAVID HOPKINS · 14 April 2021

The main problem with Government consultations, such as the Future Homes Standard, is that they always look to solve the problems in the future. The problem exists now, and we in the timber industry know it can be solved now. This is why we are calling for a ‘Net-Zero Now’ approach – there is no need to wait another decade.

At the beginning of this year, the Government set out their response to the Future Homes Standard consultation. While it was positive that the new Future Homes Standard aims to ensure that all new homes built from 2025 will produce 75-80% less carbon emissions than homes delivered under current regulations – we are demanding more action.

The main problem with these Government consultations is that they always look to solve the problems in the future. The problem exists now, and we in the timber industry know it can be solved now. This is why we are calling for a ‘Net Zero Now’ approach – there is no need to wait another decade.

Today as we respond to the second part of the consultation, on the Future Buildings Standardwe will reply in largely the same manner; to call for the inclusion of embodied carbon, a ‘fabric first’ approach to building regulations, and far quicker action from the Government to deal with the climate emergency. For those entering in their own response, an open space is left in Question 9 to ram these points forward.

For the rest of the consultation, LETI have produced a handy ‘How to Guide’ along with example answers for both short and detailed responses. We encourage interested members to follow their advice to in just 10-15 minutes help push for an acceleration of the transition to lower carbon buildings. You can find out more and download their full guidance here – https://www.leti.london/part-l.

The core principles advocated by LETI should be shared by all in the timber industry, as they primarily rest on the objective to make regulation more inclusive, wider, and tipped towards low carbon buildings and building products. Timber products have the lowest embodied carbon of any mainstream building material, and due to sequestration, every cubic metre of timber used in construction has absorbed 0.9 tonnes of CO2 which will be stored for the lifetime of the product.

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