© Chris Jackson, Building Centre

Joseph Pipal: Carbon Prints

The project

Trees are unique in their ability to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. As a designer, architect and maker, Joe feels that he has a role to play with the well-considered use of timber products and to promote sustainable wood use.

 

“At times the scale of the challenge to protect forests on the other side of the world and to reveres global economic models built on mass extraction of materials can be a bit overwhelming. But I have been pleasantly uplifted as a maker, by the simple realisation that wood use can help with the climate crisis“.

Timber treatment

Carbon Prints involves a traditional Japanese technique of preservation that chars the wood. The charred wood dust will be added to a beeswax binder to make charcoal crayons used to make the printing element.

 

The different properties of the hardwood species used in this project will reflect different prints naturally from the delineation of the wood, further visualised by the CNC’ing of the species, country of origin and carbons storage potential of each tropical hardwood species.

Timber Species

Carbon Prints was fabricated from Sapele, Iroko and Meranti.

 

Country of origin

These tropical hardwoods were responsibly sourced from Gabon, Malaysia and the Republic of Congo. These three countries are all in the negotiating stage of their Voluntary Partnership Agreement with the EU – the prerequisite of FLEGT-licensing.

 

TTF Member

Timber was responsibly sourced through Morgan Timber and Arnold Laver – both long-standing members of the Timber Trade Federation. All TTF members adhere to the Responsible Purchasing Policy, Code of Conducts and led the standard of high-quality products and sustainability to their customers.

Joe Pipal, Joe Pipal Furniture

Joe Pipal is one of six winning designers of the Conversations about Climate Change design competition. He has a wealth of knowledge and working experience including a year working for cabinetmaker David Hall, studying MA Design Products at the Royal College of Art, a BA Hons in Fine Art and started Joe Pipal Furniture in 2003.

 

Explore the ‘In Conversation with Joe Pipal‘ to find out more including his thoughts on FLEGT, sustainability, timber and the climate emergency.

Project Information
The project

Trees are unique in their ability to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. As a designer, architect and maker, Joe feels that he has a role to play with the well-considered use of timber products and to promote sustainable wood use.

 

“At times the scale of the challenge to protect forests on the other side of the world and to reveres global economic models built on mass extraction of materials can be a bit overwhelming. But I have been pleasantly uplifted as a maker, by the simple realisation that wood use can help with the climate crisis“.

Timber treatment

Carbon Prints involves a traditional Japanese technique of preservation that chars the wood. The charred wood dust will be added to a beeswax binder to make charcoal crayons used to make the printing element.

 

The different properties of the hardwood species used in this project will reflect different prints naturally from the delineation of the wood, further visualised by the CNC’ing of the species, country of origin and carbons storage potential of each tropical hardwood species.

Timber
Timber Species

Carbon Prints was fabricated from Sapele, Iroko and Meranti.

 

Country of origin

These tropical hardwoods were responsibly sourced from Gabon, Malaysia and the Republic of Congo. These three countries are all in the negotiating stage of their Voluntary Partnership Agreement with the EU – the prerequisite of FLEGT-licensing.

 

TTF Member

Timber was responsibly sourced through Morgan Timber and Arnold Laver – both long-standing members of the Timber Trade Federation. All TTF members adhere to the Responsible Purchasing Policy, Code of Conducts and led the standard of high-quality products and sustainability to their customers.

Designer
Joe Pipal, Joe Pipal Furniture

Joe Pipal is one of six winning designers of the Conversations about Climate Change design competition. He has a wealth of knowledge and working experience including a year working for cabinetmaker David Hall, studying MA Design Products at the Royal College of Art, a BA Hons in Fine Art and started Joe Pipal Furniture in 2003.

 

Explore the ‘In Conversation with Joe Pipal‘ to find out more including his thoughts on FLEGT, sustainability, timber and the climate emergency.

Joe Pipal explains Carbon Prints (video)

In an exclusive remote interview, Joe Pipal explains some background to his Carbon Prints fabrication.

The Carbon Prints installations comprise three elements: blocks, crayons and prints – all centring around the carbon nature of wood. Joe explains the technique for preservation which involves charring the timber blocks, which he then collects the dust to make the crayons for the prints, reflecting the cyclical nature of carbon and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, Joe explains.

 

“Wood is 50% carbon, and it stores that for its lifetime as an object. The magic of drawing down CO2 is part of the answer to our climate crisis“, continues Joe.

 

Joe wanted his design installation to demonstrate the capabilities of our natural resources but also raise awareness that we need to respect and treat these materials with care and sustainable management. There needs to be a better understanding of the material origin, provenance and supply chains and “as designers and architects, that’s part of our jobs now”, Joe concludes. A mission the Timber Trade Federation are working on through the FLEGT Communications Program and Conversations about Climate Change project.

 


 

In Conversation with Joe Pipal (Article)

“I’ve been uplifted, as a maker, by the simple realisation that using sustainably sourced wood can help with the climate crisis”, said Pipal.

Carbon markets for climate mitigation

Trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Carbon is stored in the wood of trees while they grow, and for the life span of an object made of that wood. This installation looks at carbon at the scale of handmade objects, and in the dust left on a carpenter’s workshop floor – illustrating the beauty of carbon in wood, and its capital value, on an intimate scale.

 


 

The issue

Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are higher today than at any point in at least the past 800,000 years. In 2019, the global average amount of CO2 hit a new record high: 409.8 parts per million.

 

The more greenhouse gases like CO2 that we release or emit, increases the heat trapped in the Earth’s atmosphere, raising global temperatures and destabilizing the climate. Human activities have directly increased the concentration of CO2 in our atmosphere, in doing so amplifying Earth’s natural greenhouse effect.

 

There is a complex political path to stop this from happening: international carbon markets. The idea, under Article 6 of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, if one country pays for carbon emissions to be reduced in a second country, the first country can count those reductions towards its own national targets. If this is done correctly, there could be almost double global emissions reduction between 2020 – 2035 (Environment Defence Fund).

 

Policies or initiatives to stop deforestation or prevent degradation are examples of where an effective emissions trading market could lead to greater investment and as a result lead to affordable GHG reductions.

 


 

The role of forests

Following the signing of the Kyoto Protocol took effect in 2005,’carbon markets’ allowed investors to offset emissions in one part of the world with savings elsewhere. Originally the focus was on industrial solutions.

 

However, as the importance of the natural world became more recognised, there have been increasing attention on directing these flows of finance into the forests. The reforms enacted between Voluntary Partnership Agreement and the FLEGT process help create a better legal environment for international investment and can combine other policy frameworks.

 

Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) encourages countries to contribute to climate change mitigation efforts by:

i) reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by slowing, halting and reversing forest loss and degradation

and ii) increasing removal of GHGs from the earth’s atmosphere through the conservation, management and expansion of forests

 

A collaboration of strengthens and technical capacities between the FAO, United Nations Development Programme and the UN Environment.

 


 

The EU FLEGT Action Plan

The EU Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Action Plan helps combat illegal logging and deforestation. Consequently, this form of sustainable forest management is an essential part t emissions reductions needed to mitigate the worst impacts of the climate emergency.

 

FLEGT can support successful REDD+ implementation by addressing some of the drivers of forest degradation and loss, promoting improved forest governance, law enforcement, and conditions for scaled-up investments including transparency, inclusive national land-use policies and effective multi-stakeholder processes.