Engineered timber – A safe and long-term solution for sustainable house building?

Engineered timber – A safe and long-term solution for sustainable house building?

ARTICLE · By Timber Trade Federation · 19 May 2020

Join this webinar on Wednesday 20 May with the Timber Trade Federation and the British Chamber of Commerce on CLT and combusitible materials legislation.

Virtual Expert Roundtable | 20 May 2020 live at 11.00am Date Wednesday 20 May 2020 Time 11.00am – 12.00pm GMT RSVP Register here for the Zoom live event The British Chamber of Commerce in Germany (BCCG) and the Timber Trade Federation (TTF) in the UK will be hosting a virtual expert roundtable to discuss the use of engineered timber (CLT) as a safe and long-term solution for sustainable house building. Chaired by Alex Altmann, a Chairman of the BCCG, and David Hopkins, Managing Director of the TTF, the panel will comprise of the following experts: • Richard Ogden, Director, Stokewood (Moderator) • Dr Darshil Shah, Centre for Natural Material Innovation, University of Cambridge • Terry Mundy, Buildoffsite Property Assurance Scheme (BOPAS) • Nic Clark, Managing Director, KLH UK • Marco Abdallah, Head of Engineering, Drees & Sommer UK • Alex Hughes, Director of DfMA, HTA Design LLP Three million new homes must be built over the next 20 years to solve the UK’s housing crisis, according to a UK Government report. At the same time, the UK’s legally binding target to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2050 will not be met without the near-complete elimination of greenhouse emissions from buildings. Fast increasing urban populations and the need to reduce its environmental impact requires a change of how we design our cities. The technology and knowledge to create high-quality, low-carbon and resilient homes exists, but current policies and standards are failing to drive the scale and pace of change needed. CLT has been a rising star since its first use in the UK in 2004. The proponents of CLT claim it can hugely speed up construction, improve safety and most importantly help to significantly reduce carbon emissions in the house building sector. Following the tragedy of Grenfell Tower in 2017 the UK Government banned the use of combustible materials from cladding and structural parts of residential high-rise buildings, including CLT. Fears were raised the ban of CLT as a structural building material was an accidental side-effect and is not in the public interest. The Government currently reviews the ban and is seeking views for its consultation. Is the ban of CLT as a structural building material justified or should the ban only apply to the external cladding? What would be the long-term effect to the UK’s building industry if the ban to use CLT as a structural building material is not reversed? How can the Government effectively achieve a safer building system? The conference will find answers to these and other questions and will submit its conclusion to the Government consultation, which closes on 25 May 2020. If you are interested in attending the roundtable discussion, please RSVP here and you will receive the full event details before 20 May 2020. For any questions or media requests please send an email to mail@bccg-uk.org