Cladding

Timber cladding satisfies the design desire of clients and customers for a more natural look, while locking away CO2 in the heart of its fibre for the lifetime of the building. From the builder’s perspective, there are a few things to double check with your architect or customer when timber cladding is being discussed.

 

Firstly make sure you thoroughly understand the intended method of application, as well as the wood species, its durability, and whether or not a flame-retardant treatment is needed. An example would be whether the timber cladding is to go up against a non-combustible surface such as a brick wall or whether there is any possibility of an air gap behind the cladding. An air gap could encourage the spread of fire: some cladding products permit an air gap but some don’t. You’ll find that level of detail on the Declaration of Performance (DoP) which should be available from the builders’ or timber merchant from whom you propose ordering the cladding.

 

Sometimes stock gets moved around in the merchant’s yard, and fire-retardant treated timber cladding may look the same as untreated material. Ask the merchant to demonstrate that the flame-retardant treated timber cladding you’re buying has both a DoP and a CE Mark, and that the scope of the DoP covers the end use or build situation in which it will be installed.

TTF Cladding Working Group

We have launched a Working Group on timber cladding to help bring clarity, guidance and promotion to the timber cladding market.

 

This initiative also involves input from TTF members, WPA and TDCA to ensure consistency across our various organisations and across the supply chain.

Timber Cladding RIBA CPD Course

This online course covers concept design and technical design stages of the RIBA Plan of Work. It offers a review of the award-winning Walk Barn Farm and a review of recent European projects using timber cladding. It also provides an introduction to the importance of specifying and detailing timber cladding correctly.

 

You will learn how to:

  • Design using timber as an external cladding and the design effects that can be achieved
  • Ensure the sustainability of timber cladding and the procurement of legal and sustainable timber
  • Specify and detail cladding
  • Issue fixing instructions to the contractor
  • Issue coating and maintenance advice to the contractor and customer
  • Relevant British Standards and Building Regulations

Amendment to Part B of the Building Regulations

The regulations specify that for all residential developments above 18m, all materials in or on the external wall must be of European Classification A2-s1, d0 or Class A1, classified in accordance with BS EN 13501-1:2007+A1:2009.

 

This includes external cladding and facade systems above that height, as well as structural timber components within the external wall.

We have worked with Wood Protection Association to produced various fact sheets and guidance on the amended Building Regulations in relation to timber cladding. Download them below.

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External Timber Cladding Factsheet

WPA-TTF GUIDANCE TO AMENDED BUILDING REGULATIONS – DECEMBER 2018

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External Timber Cladding & Fire

WPA INFORMATION SHEET

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External Timber Cladding Standards

PROPOSAL TO COMPLETE BS 8605-2 AND CREATE AN ONLINE GUIDE TO THE BS 8605 SERIES